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29 2009

Black Thursday in France

Posted in Life | 0 comments

Today is Black Thursday in France. The major unions are striking, begging workers to stay home from work and participate in large street demonstrations against President Nicolas Sarkozy’s right-wing government.
While strikes are not infrequent in my adopted country, this one has startled me and definitely made me stand up and listen.
People are mad. Really mad.
In France, not unlike many other countries around the globe, businesses collapse and unemployment soars.. And yet what is worse is the emotional and intellectual climate. The French are not alone in believing they have paid a heavy price for an economic collapse they blame on greedy bankers and inept government policies. And, to add insult to injury, a huge percentage of the population believe that , the very banks who created the economic mess are being ‘rewarded’ with multi-billion dollar support programmes.
France’s Black Thursday is not just a 24 hour blip on the screen. It is instead another illustration of how people-and consumers-around the globe are shifting their expectations and raising the goalpost for corporations everywhere. No longer willing to accept or trust elites to control their lives, the game—and the conversation—has changed forever.
And social media in all its form is at the center of this shift. People aren’t just flooding to social media in the millions to chat with their friends. They are there because they want to talk, to articulate opinions and most importantly to be heard.

I believe that when historians look back on the beginning of the 21st century, they will write a big chapter on social media. It is both indicative of the times we live in and a leading force. And for corporations trying to figure out how to weather out these latest storms, it is definitely not a fad.

We ignore what it symbolizes at our peril.

Today is Black Thursday in France. The major unions are striking, begging workers to stay home from work and participate in large street demonstrations against President Nicolas Sarkozy’s right-wing government.

While strikes are not infrequent in my adopted country, this one has startled me and definitely made me stand up and listen.

People are mad.  Really mad.

In France, not unlike many other countries around the globe,  businesses collapse and unemployment soars..  And yet what is worse is the emotional and intellectual climate.  The French are not alone in believing  they have paid a heavy price for an economic collapse they blame on greedy bankers and inept government policies.   And, to add insult to injury, a huge percentage of the population believe that , the very banks who created the economic mess  are being ‘rewarded’ with multi-billion dollar support programmes.

France’s Black Thursday  is not just a 24 hour blip on the screen.  It is instead another illustration of how people-and consumers-around the globe are shifting their expectations and raising the goalpost for corporations everywhere.  No longer willing to accept or trust elites to control their lives, the game-and the conversation-has changed forever.

And social media in all its form is at the center of this shift.  People aren’t just flooding to social media in the millions to chat with their friends. They are there because they want to talk, to articulate opinions and most importantly to be heard.

I believe that when historians look back on the beginning of the 21st century, they will write a big chapter on social media. It is both indicative of the times we live in and a leading force.  And for corporations trying to figure out how to weather out these latest storms, it is definitely not a fad.

We ignore what it symbolizes at our peril.

Today is Black Thursday in France. The major unions are striking, begging workers to stay home from work and participate in large street demonstrations against President Nicolas Sarkozy’s right-wing government.
While strikes are not infrequent in my adopted country, this one has startled me and definitely made me stand up and listen.
People are mad. Really mad.
In France, not unlike many other countries around the globe, businesses collapse and unemployment soars.. And yet what is worse is the emotional and intellectual climate. The French are not alone in believing they have paid a heavy price for an economic collapse they blame on greedy bankers and inept government policies. And, to add insult to injury, a huge percentage of the population believe that , the very banks who created the economic mess are being ‘rewarded’ with multi-billion dollar support programmes.
France’s Black Thursday is not just a 24 hour blip on the screen. It is instead another illustration of how people-and consumers-around the globe are shifting their expectations and raising the goalpost for corporations everywhere. No longer willing to accept or trust elites to control their lives, the game—and the conversation—has changed forever.
And social media in all its form is at the center of this shift. People aren’t just flooding to social media in the millions to chat with their friends. They are there because they want to talk, to articulate opinions and most importantly to be heard.

I believe that when historians look back on the beginning of the 21st century, they will write a big chapter on social media. It is both indicative of the times we live in and a leading force. And for corporations trying to figure out how to weather out these latest storms, it is definitely not a fad.

We ignore what it symbolizes at our peril.

Today is Black Thursday in France. The major unions are striking, begging workers to stay home from work and participate in large street demonstrations against President Nicolas Sarkozy’s right-wing government.
While strikes are not infrequent in my adopted country, this one has startled me and definitely made me stand up and listen.
People are mad. Really mad.
In France, not unlike many other countries around the globe, businesses collapse and unemployment soars.. And yet what is worse is the emotional and intellectual climate. The French are not alone in believing they have paid a heavy price for an economic collapse they blame on greedy bankers and inept government policies. And, to add insult to injury, a huge percentage of the population believe that , the very banks who created the economic mess are being ‘rewarded’ with multi-billion dollar support programmes.
France’s Black Thursday is not just a 24 hour blip on the screen. It is instead another illustration of how people-and consumers-around the globe are shifting their expectations and raising the goalpost for corporations everywhere. No longer willing to accept or trust elites to control their lives, the game—and the conversation—has changed forever.
And social media in all its form is at the center of this shift. People aren’t just flooding to social media in the millions to chat with their friends. They are there because they want to talk, to articulate opinions and most importantly to be heard.

I believe that when historians look back on the beginning of the 21st century, they will write a big chapter on social media. It is both indicative of the times we live in and a leading force. And for corporations trying to figure out how to weather out these latest storms, it is definitely not a fad.

We ignore what it symbolizes at our peril.